Flipped Joint Ventures to Grow Your Revenue

"Using the Power of Joint Ventures to Increase Your Profits 30% or More" with Grant Segall

From the e-book "10 Minutes to E-Commerce Success", where 17 E-commerce experts share their wisdom for growing and scaling an e-commerce store.  


"Adding a Revenue Stream to Increase Profits Using Flipped Joint Ventures" with Grant Segall

Grant Segall Tsunamiclick.com

Karis Lima: Hi, and welcome to 10 Minutes to E-commerce Success. Today we're joined by Grant Segall. How are you doing today, Grant?

Grant Segall: I'm doing very well. Thank you for asking.

Karis: Great. Tell us a little bit about yourself and what you do.

Grant: I sure will. I run a Conversion Rate Optimization (CRO) agency. We work with primarily E-commerce clients, Software as a Service (SaaS), and lead capture or lead generation companies. What we do is we optimize website for conversions and growing revenue for those companies by optimizing their websites. Now we are also delving into the setting up partnerships between said companies where we grow their revenues by finding them strategic partners.

Karis: If I was considering working for your company, what would you say ... Why should we listen to you?

Grant: That's all right. I understand. The question is why would we work with you? Well, there's a number of reasons. First, we use a data-driven approach. We're not guessing as to why people are buying from you or figuring out why your pages aren't converting or your shopping cart isn't converting. We're using data, and we're making our decisions based off that. That data gives you valuable insights as to what your customer, your visitor, is looking for. Sometimes the data tells us they can't find what they need. I would say our team’s experience of working with over 60 companies, we've gathered quite a bit of intelligence on E-commerce and Software as a Service website. We've figured out, in a lot of cases, what works best on those websites.

Karis: Okay. Now, for the main reason we do the 10 Minutes to E-Commerce Success. The big money question, which is what is the one thing you do that increases the profits for an eCommerce company?

Grant: Okay. Well, that's a tough question. I've asked this to 16 other people before me, and this is going to be my answer. You would think I would say conversion rate optimization. That's great if you're doing millions of dollars in sales and you can afford the return on your investment. We usually work with larger companies above one million dollars in sales. I say if you're a smaller entity, even a larger entity, it's partnering up with other companies that might sell complementary products to what you do. The method we do that is called flipped joint ventures. I don't know if you're familiar with that concept. Are you?

Karis: Not really.

Grant: No? Okay. A flipped joint venture is basically you would go out and approach other companies that sell complementary products to what you are already offering. Say, for example, you are an E-commerce store, and you sell ... I don't know. This might be a simple example, but maybe you sell flat screen TVs. That's all you do is you sell flat screen TVs, and someone buys your flat screen TV, and then they start thinking, "Well, what other things do I need? Well, maybe I need a universal remote. Maybe I need brackets to hang this thing on a wall. Maybe I need a new cabinet or furniture that goes ... That the TV will hang in." You can seek out partners as you don't carry those particular products.
Here's the catch. The reason why I call this flipped joint ventures is because when you do a joint venture, most of the time, there's a high failure rate. Even Harvard University has noted, and I believe Entrepreneur Magazine as well, that most joint ventures fail. There's a very high failure rate, and that's because of the conventional method of setting up a JV is full of problems. It introduces multiple friction points, differences in list size, lack of a prior relationship with most of the partners you approach, and doubts from each side about getting paid. There's significant problems that derail many joint ventures before you get started.
The way we get around that is we do a JV flip or "flipped Joint venture" where the equation gets a 90-95% agreement rate from the partners you approach. This is why we work with companies to do this for them. Obviously, they can do this themselves. This is something any company can do on their own, but it can be time consuming. You approach partners, if you have a list, a sizable list of customers, and you offer to promote their products first. Don't expect a reciprocal mailing. Then, you have a much higher chance of getting accepted. Later on down the road as you sell these partners' products over a course of time, many of them are going to come back to you and say, "Hey, is there a way we can do another deal where we sell your particular products to our list?" You might get 20 to 40% of those people will come back and offer to do that for you as well. Then you end up getting the two-sided deal that you were after in the first place.
If you follow this consistent strategy of offering a joint venture, offering a new product to your list maybe once a month, we've seen companies increase their profits ... Not sales, but profits ... 30% on the low end and up to 70% on the high end. That's one thing I would recommend that all E-commerce stores look into as they're looking to grow and maybe they're stagnating.

Karis: That was quite an interesting take on growing your company's profit. Anything else before we go you would like to mention?

Grant: Just one more thing. I wanted to mention that the approach that I mentioned for doing these joint ventures, you are basically ... There's a number of advantages to it. You eliminate all the problems and frustration caused by the conventional approach of setting up joint ventures. You're going to get a 90% agreement rate from the partners you approach. You're going to get paid to build your relationship with potential partners, and you get to lock in a large revenue steam every month on a systematic basis.
If you follow the program and offer, like I said, one product each month to your list of subscribers, you can really grow your profits substantially with very little risk. You don't have to worry about product creation, product development, product fulfillment. It's all handled by your partner, so, basically, you're getting a method of growing your profits almost risk free. The caveat here is you need to find reputable partners that will deliver a good experience and have enough product in stock. Especially if you have a large list. Test the offer to a small portion of your list, and if everything goes well ramp it up! Most of the time you can do a 50% share of the profits with the company you are going to promote. Like I mentioned, do this once a month, and you have added another profit center to your business.

Karis: Okay. Thanks for speaking with us today. How can people find out more about ...? More information on you and what you do?

Grant: Oh, okay. Well, the easiest thing to do is just go to Tsunamiclick.com, and there's a contact form there if you want to reach us. It's on the home page. We're also going to be setting up a series of interviews. All that information will be on our website. Thanks! This was fun.

Karis: Okay. That's a wrap. Goodbye from 10 Minutes to E-commerce Success.

Episode 16 – Robin Smith on Differentiation and Complex Integration of Data

Robin Smith - VL OMNI   

Co-Founder      

Since 1994, VL Omni has been automating and integrating data for the omnichannel retail sector (both B2B and B2C). VL is one of the first Shopify Plus Technology Partners, and Robin has been invited to speak at numerous events on the topics of e-commerce strategy, growth, and more.

About VL OMNI: VL integrates and automates data strategically, applying business rules to the data transformation directly so that there is no need to manually manipulate the data at the target application. VL provides point to multi-point integration using cutting-edge programming strategies, languages, storage solutions, and more.


"Integrating Complex Data, a Key to E-commerce Growth and Scalability" with Robin Smith

Interview Excerpt Below:

"Grant: Alright. Fair enough. If an e-commerce business owner wanted to work with you guys, what would you say is ... What would be a reasoning why you think that you would be a good fit for them or why you're good at what you do?

Robin: The kind of e-commerce store operator we target is not the entry level. We're not a plug and play solution, so we tend to look for the ones that are scaling, that are struggling with complexity in their supply chain and complexity in their business operations, and those that are mature companies that are sticking their toe into the e-commerce space for the first time. Those two touch-points, and those align with platforms like, say, Shopify Plus, for example. Magento.

Grant: Okay.

Robin: What we like to do with customers is we like to work through their business model and look at the work flows that they want to put in place to actually engender a solid customer experience that represents their brand, and also allow them to leverage proper integration strategies so that they're building the foundation for scalability. Many companies approach integration as point to point, plug and play, quick, dirty, and they hit that Black Friday/Cyber Monday curve or maybe it's something else that's specific to their business, and all of a sudden, it's like they had the wind taken right of them because they hit a brick wall. I've seen this so many times. Laying a proper foundation is really, really critical. If you're in it for the long term, then you want to scale.

Grant: Okay. That's a great segue into our Money Question of the Day. If you had the chance to work with an e-commerce business owner, what would be the one thing you would focus on to grow their profits or increase their sales?

Robin: How do you differentiate yourself from your competition? What is it that makes you unique? What makes you the place that I want to go and buy that product? Is it the quality of your product? Is it the quality of your experience? Is it the quality of your customer service, the way that you interact? Or is it just that you're so cool, that I have to be buying from you?

I think if the answer is, I want to have a superior customer experience and I want to have a unique brand identification beyond product, then the underlying key issue there is how you use the data you're collecting and how you integrate your platforms, your application stack. If a customer is answering yes to those kind of questions, then they should be talking to us.

10 Minutes to E-Commerce Success

!0 Minutes to E-Commerce Success Interview Series

Episode 15 – Harris Siddiqui on Product Research Determines what to Sell

Harris Siddiqui - Within the Flow  

Founder     

A growth hacker by trade, Harris has been working with brands around the world adapt to digital media for a decade. At Within The Flow, he has built a community of e-commerce professionals aimed at the pooling and sharing of knowledge and resources as well as collectively solving problems.


"Proper Product Research a Must When Getting Started in E-commerce" with Harris Siddiqui

Interview Excerpt Below:

“Grant: Excellent. And if I was a budding E-commerce entrepreneur and I wanted to get into this field, why should we listen to you?

Harris S: Well, I have right now at this moment worked on two very successful E-commerce stores. They both hit six figures in revenues, and they have razor sharp niche markets. Like we started from scratch with no prior knowledge when it came to running online stores, and we’ve … let’s say, spent a significant amount of time learning from the best in the industry.

We’ve spent more time learning than we did working in the store just to be able to solve all the problems that came with it.

The store became successful after a great deal of trial and error and persistence. I’ve gone through every inch of Shopify and Woo Commerce’s innards at this point. So that would be my credentials for this particular industry.

Grant: Nice, and if someone wanted to get a hold of this resource what website would they go to … or any sort of contact information?

Harris: They would go to Within the Flow It’s pronounced Harris but it’s … everyone just calls me Harris.

Grant: Yes, it’s true. And now you’re ready for the big question – if you were working with an E-commerce store owner what would be the one biggest thing or the one thing you would do to make the biggest difference in their profits?

Harris: Now this is something that might sound simple but it actually isn’t. And that is product research. Because when we were starting off we had the resources, we had the [inaudible 00:03:20], we had a domain and whatnot. We basically … we were ready to go, but we didn’t know what to sell. So normally in this situation what someone would do is something like, “Okay, this product looks nice, it has lots of searches on Google. It’s got a nice trend going. Maybe I should start a fidget spinner store.”

Grant: Uh-huh.

Harris: That’s not exactly a good idea. The broad appeal does not always work. They need to have a process established and that process needs to yield numbers in terms of both the product, the budget, and the audiences.

10 Minutes to E-Commerce Success

!0 Minutes to E-Commerce Success Interview Series

Episode 14 – Michelle Stinson Ross on Optimizing Paid and Organic Search

Michelle Stinson Ross - Gruen Agency 

VP of Marketing and Sales    

As the VP of Marketing and Sales, I am Gruen Agency’s internal marketing strategist and chief brand evangelist. Frankly, I get into everybody else’s stuff – website, content, social marketing, search marketing, industry thought leadership, digital advertising, consulting, speaking and training. Take a listen to Search Talk Live as I help interview other industry experts about digital marketing.

Over the course of this crazy career I have worked in-house for several consumer brands, provided content for travel brands, and consulted with nearly every type of small business under the sun. I wake up every day totally fascinated by marketing systems and how they touch the every-day lives of people. Every opportunity I get to teach or train someone else about marketing communication gives me joy.

Along with all of that, I am the designated cool mom with three mostly to nearly adult children. I love to travel and meet new people. And, in those rare moments of free time, I love to read and write historic and steampunk fiction. 


"Growing an E-commerce Store’s Profits by Optimizing Paid and Organic Search" with Michelle Stinson Ross

Interview Excerpt Below:

“Grant: Okay. And you guys … You mentioned that you’ve been in business for 25 years, so that’s an obvious track record. And why would an e-commerce business come to you guys in the first place?

Michelle: We actually specialize in conversions, and I happen to have a case study that we did for an e-com client. And just sort of give you a sense of the success rate that we have for digital marketing with e-com. After our study, they had an 88% increase in active products able to appear in Google search results. They had a 98% decrease in errors related to their advertised product information, and 61% decrease in the cost per acquisition, without giving it any sales volume whatsoever.

Grant: Nice. And what type of e-commerce store was that? Can you say in general?

Michelle: Yes, this was one of the case studies that is available on our website. This was work that we did for Maui Jim, the sunglasses company.

Grant: Oh, yeah, yeah.

Michelle: Yeah. It was a combination of both paid and organic search that we were able to get those kinds of results. One of the big things that Maui Jim really needed was just to make sure that their product pages and particularly the product feed to Google was consistent across the board, product, to product, to product. And just by cleaning up their product feed, we were able to get results like that. That was before we even turned on paid search. But then we also layered on that process, with some better campaign positioning. So that. our paid search, we were able to put the right product in front of the right person at the right time and lower that cost, per acquisition.

Grant: Okay, and if you were to start working with an e-commerce agency, what would be the number one thing you guys would utilize in order to grow their profits?

Michelle: It would really be kind of that same process I just described for Maui Jim. We would do an audit of existing Google shopping campaigns, look to make sure that their paid campaigns were optimized, that they were properly segmented, that sort of stuff. That we could turn things on and off as needed. And also, take a really long, hard look at their product feeds to make sure that when people go to organic search, that in the carousel, the right product was showing for organic search as well.

10 Minutes to E-Commerce Success

!0 Minutes to E-Commerce Success Interview Series

Episode 13 – Rishi Rawat – Reducing Cognitive Load Increases Sales

Rishi Rawat - Frictionless Commerce 

Founder  

Frictionless Commerce: Specializes in helping brands convert first-time buyers? How do we do this? We use a process called AEJR (amplify desire, establish trust, justify price, and reduce cognitive load).

About Rishi: When I started in 2008 my core thesis was that most purchase behaviors were rational. 8 years on and 212 experiments in we know nearly ALL purchase triggers are irrational. And this is good news because it means we can influence purchase behavior.


"How Reducing Cognitive Load Increases Sales" with Rishi Rawat

Interview Excerpt Below:

“Grant: It sounds like if you give the justification and it makes sense to the end-user, the consumer, they’re usually okay with that and you don’t have to follow the herd of people that are out there giving free shipping because that’s what they’re told to do. Right?

Rishi: That’s exactly right. We have a framework internally. We call it AEJR. It’s an acronym and it stands for amplify desire, justify price, establish trust, and reduce cognitive load. Those are the four pillars on which we do all conversion optimization. I think that the first three are pretty obvious. Amplify desire, obviously, people get it. Establish trust, people get it. Justify price, people understand as well, but reducing cognitive load is something that I think not enough businesses think about.

One of the things that I’ve found is when I talk to clients and I look at their page and I say, “Who is your audience?” They have a very clear definition of who their audience is, and I say, “But when I read the description, it seems like you’re trying to satisfy many different audiences.” What they tell me is that, “Well, three years ago, we were also focused on this audience and we also think that this customer, even though they represent 10% of sales, that’s still 10%. We can’t ignore it.”

But when I look at the page, I realize that this person or this person is 10% of sales, yet they’re getting 30% of the real estate of the page. To me, there’s a disconnect there. I think one of the things that happen over time, and this is natural to any business, is that as they learn more about their business, as they learn more about their audience, they keep on adding more and more stuff on the page. For example, if there’s a website where there is a product and they’ve listed five features, as they start selling this product and they sell thousands and thousands of units, their customer service comes back and says, “Hey, we’re kind of hearing a lot of people in Florida say that one of the features they really like about the product is the fact that it’s portable.” They’ll be like, “Oh, that’s really interesting. That’s an important feature. Let’s add it to our list.” It’s this additive nature where we’re constantly adding more and more stuff because we want to make sure that we’re talking to all potential customers.

To me, that is really dangerous. It’s one of the most common mistakes I see with retailers or with online businesses, is they just put too much stuff out there. As a result of that, it doesn’t necessarily speak clearly with effectiveness to that one audience. What we do is when we talk about reducing cognitive load, what we do is we actually eliminate everything that we feel can be eliminated without shutting the business down. Then we start adding it back in and we ask for justification for each of those elements and as a result, without much effort, we’re able to reduce the amount of content or the amount of information being propagated on that page by 30%. Just a simple act like that has a magical effect on conversion rates.

Grant: Wow. That’s pretty interesting there because less is more. What’s the old adage? “Less is more.” I don’t know who said that, but it sounds like that’s what you’re doing.

Rishi: That’s right.”

10 Minutes to E-Commerce Success

!0 Minutes to E-Commerce Success Interview Series

Episode 12 – Thom O’Leary – Focus on the Little Details for Long-Term Growth

Thom O'Leary - Fixer Group Consulting    

President 

Thom O’Leary is the President of FIXER Group Consulting.  He specializes in massive growth strategies for e-commerce clients, and helps already successful stores reach their full potential of growth with marketing and tech solutions.  When you don’t know exactly what kind of e-commerce help you need, you probably need a FIXER.


"Why Looking at the Little Details of Your Store Improves Your Long-Term Profits" with Thom O’Leary

Interview Excerpt Below:

“Grant: Yeah. I guess they’re inundated with business. Now for the big question of the day, which was the whole reasoning for this interview. If an eCommerce company approached you to grow their sales or profits, what is the one thing you would do for them, the one thing that you think would have the biggest impact on their profits?

Thom: Sure. Profits are not just short-term, they’re long-term, and as you do whatever other efforts you’re doing over time, if you don’t have a strong foundation, you’re never going to hit your maximum potential. So, what I always say to any new client regardless of the project, we have to look at the foundations of your site, that is site speed, that is search engine optimization, that is checkout flow, that is color scheme, that is the site navigation. All of the boring stuff that people do once and forget about. You need to revisit that stuff because that’s what’s going to make the difference between profitability–especially long-term profitability–and failure because it becomes much too …

Basically, let’s say an alternate answer. I said well, you have to do Facebook advertising or do online advertising. Well, if your site is not up to snuff, you’re throwing money away, you’re burning it. Every dollar you spend, you’re not getting the maximum impact from it, which cuts into your margin, which cuts out your profit. So, that’s why 100% of the time building that strong foundation, whether you’re a brand-new company or whether you are 10, 15, 20, 25 million dollar a year company. Every client I’ve seen even the ones who do incredibly well still need some of that punched up, and if you don’t take care of that then you’re shooting yourself in the foot.

Grant: All right.

Thom: And in fact, if I could give a part B, I’d say email marketing. A little too simple.

Grant: Yeah, email marketing. That’s one that I see a lot of people don’t do still in this day and age. It still surprises me. But yeah, that’s great.

Thom: [inaudible 00:05:33] yeah, it’s you have to do email marketing, but even still making sure that everything, particularly site speed on mobile, you got to do that first.

Grant: Yeah, especially if you’re ranking for organic. I think Google penalizes you when your site’s not fast enough, at least on mobile I know that to be true.

Thom:  That is true, and you pay more for ads, and you have a higher bounce rate. You pay for ads that aren’t doing anything for you. Yeah, that’s critical, and that’s only becoming more and more critical over time.

10 Minutes to E-Commerce Success

!0 Minutes to E-Commerce Success Interview Series

Episode 11 – Kristin Marquet – Using PR and Pinterest to Break the Bank

Kristin Marquet - Creative Development Agency   

Founder & Creative Director 

With a no B.S. attitude, Kristin is the founder and managing director of Creative Development Agency (formerly award-winning firm, Marquet Media). She oversees the day-to-day operations of the agency as well as directs all client accounts and projects. Kristin also develops, manages, and implements various internal and external communication and social media initiatives. With a strong eye for creating memorable brands and a diverse range of knowledge, Kristin provides strategic counsel to clients interested in developing successful internal and external communication programs across all media platforms.

Kristin has forged successful partnerships with celebrity fashion designer and correspondent NV Nick Verreos; prestige hair care brand Briogeo; French accessory designer Mona Roussette; and many more. She has generated media placements in Wall Street Journal, The Today Show, Seventeen, Glamour, and ELLE magazines, refinery29.com, and countless other outlets.

Kristin holds a master's degree in marketing and PR from New York University, and is also a contributor to HuffingtonPost.com, Entrepreneur.com, and NYDailyNews.com. She is the owner of business consultancy, FemFounder.co, and the founder of the lifestyle tech startup,TheHauteRebel.com. She is also the author of the book, Squash the competition and Dominate your marketplace: 55 easy Tips to Generate Big Publicity for your startup or small business.


"Using Pinterest and PR to Boost Your Revenue and Subscribers" with Kristin Marquet

Interview Excerpt Below:

“Grant: Nice, so you’re driving Pinterest. You’re putting your pins up, I guess. I don’t know a ton about Pinterest. You’re driving them to your website. A little more specifics on that, please.

Kristin: Yeah, absolutely. OK, so many people think of Pinterest as a social network, but it really isn’t. It’s more of a search engine. It’s like a visual engine. It’s fantastic if you optimize all your boards in your profile for whatever you’re trying to rank for, just like you would on Google. It’s going to increase your rankings, obviously, in the search results, but your pins are going to start showing up consistently and getting re-pinned.

The great thing about Pinterest, unlike Instagram, is all of your pins, you’re able to link back to different blog posts or a landing page to get email opt-ins. It is a great way to build an email list. I would say I actually have a couple other side businesses. Pinterest is our largest drivers for those businesses, as well, which I’m not going to really get into, because it’s not really relevant to this conversation.

I can sit here and talk about Pinterest for a million hours, for days and days on end. But essentially, you want to optimize your profile, your board with the right keywords. You want to make sure that your pins are aesthetically pleasing, they look good. You pin them to the right boards. You join group boards so that you can reach more audiences. You link back to all of the right blog posts or landing pages so that you could get people to opt into your newsletter, or your website, or content upgrades, or whatever it is you’re trying to promote. It’s fantastic.

Grant: Wow, that sounds pretty slick, OK. I never thought of the power of Pinterest, but now you’re making me a believer. And the second part to that question, since you own an agency as well, what would you recommend to an eCommerce store to grow their profits as quickly as possible? What techniques or strategies? But if you’re only going to say one.

Kristin: If I could only say one, as an agency, yeah, I think that eCommerce businesses, the best way to build your business is definitely trying to execute a PR plan. It’s not rocket science. I actually have a free course for people that are interested in dipping their toe into the vast world of PR, without hiring an agency, so that they can learn the basics. It’s actually called the PR Academy. I could actually share that link with you later, but PR could be a game-changer for your eCommerce business, especially if you end up getting links back to your website from websites like the Huffington Post, Bustle, BuzzFeed, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, anywhere your market or target audiences hang out.

It’s not that hard like I said. You don’t need to hire a PR firm if you’re just starting out because PR firms are very expensive. They’re $5,000, $10,000 a month, and there’s no guarantee that you’re going to get coverage. Once you learn the basics of PR, it’s like the sky’s the limit for eCommerce businesses.

10 Minutes to E-Commerce Success

!0 Minutes to E-Commerce Success Interview Series

Episode 10 – John Logar – Know Your Customer

John Logar - Consulting Unleashed  

Founder 

For the last 25 years as a sales professional, marketing consultant, trainer, international speaker and coach, John has helped clients generate millions of dollars in businesses all around the world in almost every imaginable industry. He has had the unique privilege to have conducted over 5,000 one-on-one strategic focus sessions with Managing Directors, CEO's and Entrepreneurs in over 140 different industry groups. In those focus sessions he was able to see how they grew their businesses, what they did to market their businesses, what worked and what didn’t work, who their customers were, what their strategy and tactics were, their sales processes and their metrics for managing their businesses.

In the last 18 months John has helped launch 27 consulting businesses that have generated over $4.2 million dollars in consulting contracts around the world. Most importantly, John cuts through all the fluff and gives you real actionable strategies that work.

"Why Getting to Know Your Customers is Essential to Your E-commerce Store’s Success" with John Logar

Continue reading

Episode 9 – Brian Lim Talks Shark Tank & Sustainable Growth

Brian Lim - The Emazing Group    

Founder & CEO  

Since 2010, The Emazing Group has been the comprehensive e-commerce solution for passion-driven consumer lifestyle brands. With unique and innovative brands such as EmazingLights, iHeartRaves and INTO THE AM, The Emazing Group has successfully created and scaled market-leading companies, empowering a lifestyle of self-expression one individual at a time.

A few years ago, our Brian Lim appeared on ABC’s Shark Tank, where he received offers from all five sharks and ended up accepting deals from Mark Cuban and Daymond John.


Here's that episode of Shark Tank for your viewing pleasure.  Click Here


​"Shark Tank Contestant Dishes His Secret to Sustainable Growth" with Brian Lim
[Audio Unavailable - Full Transcript Below]

Continue reading

Episode 8 – Kent Lewis on Slow Equals Less Sales

Kent Lewis - Anvil Media  

President  

As President and Founder of Anvil Media, Inc., Kent Lewis is responsible for ensuring the company is living its mission and vision by managing overall corporate strategy including operations, business development, sales and marketing. Specializing in analytics, search engine and social media marketing services, Anvil is an integrated marketing consultancy which provides measurable marketing that moves clients’ businesses forward. Under his leadership since 2000, Anvil has accumulated the following awards and recognition:
  • Inc. 5000: Fastest growing private companies in America
  • Portland Business Journal: Oregon’s Most Admired Companies
  • Portland Business Journal: Fastest Growing Private 100 Companies (for five consecutive years)
  • Portland Business Journal: Corporate Philanthropy Awards winner
  • Clutch: Top Pay-per-Click Agencies in America  


"One Critical Aspect You Must Improve on Your Website" with Kent Lewis 

Continue reading
1 2 3